Tag Archives: mobile

Students ask for more video with their learning

A few years back we invested in the streaming video service – Films on Demand. The service integrates with our campus portal and the Lakeland Library to permit faculty the means of integrating educational video into their course materials. Compared with the former system of ordering individual media (VHS, DVD), this has proved to be a very good investment. Nevertheless, the level of adoption has been less than expected.

Fims on Demand - Collections

Films on Demand – Collections

In our recent survey of online learners, students reported that they would like to have more video content in their online courses. Streaming video is becoming an extremely popular way for students to view content as is evidenced by the rate of adoption of such services as iTunes U and Khan Academy.

According to a recent article in Inside Higher Ed reporting on thePearson Higher Ed Survey on Student Mobile usage

“Eight in ten (83%) college students regularly use a smartphone, up significantly from 72% in 2013.  Smartphones are now close to laptops (89%) as the mobile device students are most likely to use on a regular basis.”

Perhaps the increased use of smartphones by students helps to explain the demand for more video content. Although I enjoy reading journal articles and other text-based material on my iPad because of the size and orientation, I am not a big fan of reading text on my iPhone. That being said, the iPhone works great with streaming video – especially with WiFi available both at work and home.

iPhone CC-BY-NC-SA by Alex Bartok on Flickr

CC-BY-NC-SA by Alex Bartok on Flickr

Films on Demand is available to both faculty and students and although we have promoted its use primarily with the faculty – demonstrating how to search for relevant content from among the more than 15,000 titles and 200,000 plus segments – students also may access these materials and find value in searching through the collections themselves.

Are we speaking the same language?

With the emergence of new technologies that instantly translate languages, are we arriving at a time and place when we can have meaningful discussions without speaking the same language?

CC-BY-NC-SA by Manar Hussain on Flickr

CC-BY-NC-SA by Manar Hussain on Flickr

I am currently enrolled in a MOOC on research methodology through Coursera. The instructors are from the University of London and the participants are from all over the world. One of the challenges with this course is that people responding to one another in English possess varying degrees of fluency.

It seems to me we might be better off with people posting not in English, but in their own language. There has been real improvement in translation technology in the past couple of years and apps such as Google Translate do a pretty good job of translating across a number of languages. So when enrolling in a MOOC, rather than attempting to translate every discussion into English why not just post in your native language? I would post in English, but you would read my post and comment on it in Portuguese – a classmate reads your post in German and responds in German.

By reading and writing in the language we are most comfortable with, we are more likely to express our thoughts with greater clarity and depth (instead of being distracted with how I might translate my words for you). This puts the onus on the receiver for making meaning from what is said, and the reader can ask for clarification as needed.

Google Translate

Google Translate

The technologies of language translation are not limited to text.  Skype Translator will permit real-time language translation via web conferencing, adding the potential for yet another layer of interactivity for online and open course participants.

Apps like Word Lens by Quest Visual (recently purchased by Google) translate visual images in real-time to text using apps on your iPhone or Android smartphone.

How long before Word Lens and other translator apps are integrated into wearable technologies like smart glasses permitting travelers to walk about in foreign cities seeing the sights and signs translated instantly for them into their own language?

By using these tools in MOOCs where various languages are spoken in the same course, we have much greater potential to increase and improve the quality of our interactions and understandings across cultures and languages.

What will the active learning classroom look like in the not-so-distant future?

There are a number of emerging trends in classroom technology that will likely shape the way we teach and learn in the very near future.  These trends include mobile technologies (BYOD), improved wireless connectivity, and an increased demand for flexible learning spaces.

LearnLab @ Holden University Center, Lakeland Community College

Learn::Lab @ Holden University Center, Lakeland Community College

The Learn Lab at the Holden University Center is an example of an active learning classroom. With three interactive projection whiteboards placed strategically around the room, students are able to connect and to share their work using interactive screens and their laptops. The instructor can display content for all students or small groups from anywhere in the room. The direct line-of-sight configuration creates an optimal environment for student-to-student, student-to-instructor, and student-to-content interactions.

When this classroom was built a few years ago it was considered “state-of-the-art”.  With the current configuration tables are outfitted with hubs that are wired into the interactive projection screens. Students plug in with their laptops to collaborate with their group. In the short span of a few years we have seen the rapid adoption of tablets and other hand-held technologies. Students are now bringing their personal technology into the classroom with the expectation of using them in support of their own learning.

We are now at a point when wireless technology permits students and faculty to connect and share their devices: laptops, iPads and other tablets, as well as smartphones. This mobility will change how we interact with classroom technologies. It means no longer having to place tables in a fixed location – resulting in greater flexibility. High definition monitors with build in Wi-Fi (or connected devices such as Apple TV) will likely replace interactive projectors and whiteboards as the preferred projection surface – with content from our apps on our hand-held devices.

The next generation interactive classroom…

1) will support students bringing their smartphones and tablets (BYOD) into the classroom. Students can expect to interact with their peers and the content / media on-the-fly, at the same time, discovering new ways to use classroom and web-based technologies to support their own learning.

2) will be increasingly wireless. Apple TV is already being used in classrooms where students and their teachers share their assignments and class projects on high definition TV screens. Emerging wireless technologies such as 802.11 ac, mean faster connection speeds and improved quality of shared media.

3) will mean classrooms are more configurable around the people using them rather than the fixtures and technology in the room. The use of multiple surfaces fosters collaboration, creativity and design, permitting students and instructors the ability to display, capture and share these interactions.

New learning spaces are emerging as a blend of the formal and informal – with flexibility driving design. I envision the classroom in the not-so-distant future will require multiple screens, myriad writing surfaces, configurable and mobile furniture with high speed Wi-Fi and the ability to connect and project from the student’s device of choice.

Sounds messy.

 

Smartphones and Voice to Text

Most of our students have smart phones and while they work great for looking things up on the web and playing YouTube videos and social media, writing using handheld technology can be cumbersome at best.

How to type diagram CC-BY by Crossett Library Bennington College on Flickr.

How to type diagram by Crossett Library Bennington College on Flickr.

The technology of voice-to-text is actually improving over time. It’s quite possible to effectively participate in a discussion or post an essay using a smartphone or tablet with just a little practice.

“Writing” from your smartphone maybe done using voice-to-text but it takes a little getting used to. If you simply dictate into your phone you’ll spend a good deal of time correcting words, breaking out paragraphs and inserting punctuation, capitalizing the first word of each sentence, etc.

With a little practice you can get the job done and potentially in less time than it takes to write an essay. By ending sentences with “period” or “question mark” and starting a new paragraph by including “new paragraph” in the dictation, the outcome is much improved. If you make a mistake, you can repeat the sentence and simply delete the error.

Dragon dictation is a free app I downloaded to my iPhone and iPad. I find it does a much better job of interpreting than a lot of other voice-to-text solutions. Because it makes very few mistakes dictation can be significantly faster than typing using a keyboard.

Phablets?

My colleague got a new smartphone and it’s kinda huge. I said to him, “that’s the biggest phone I’ve ever seen”. “Its an android”, said he. He showed me the display and all the stuff he had on it and I have to admit, its pretty cool. But still… seems like a lot to lug around.

On the other hand…

It appears Bluetooth might be the answer.

Does social media belong in the classroom?

Social media, when used for teaching and learning encourage student-to-faculty, student-to-student, and student-to-content interaction and thereby have the potential to increase learner engagement.

CC-BY-NC-SA by Espacio Camon on Flickr

CC-BY-NC-SA by Espacio Camon on Flickr

A few years ago, Rey Junco researched the effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades and found that “Twitter can be used as an educational tool to help engage students and to mobilize faculty into a more active and participatory role.”

Although use of social media has increased for both students and teachers their preference is for personal rather than for educational purposes.

The Social Media for Teaching and Learning report by Pearson & Babson finds faculty use of social media has increased in all areas: personal, professional, and educational. However, most faculty still have some strong reservations when it comes to use in the classroom. Although it appears that both faculty and students see the value of integrating mobile technologies into teaching and learning, both groups are concerned with privacy and prefer to keep their personal separate from their academic lives.

“Concerns about privacy, both for themselves and for their students, and about maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, have been at the top of the list of concerns in all of the reports. Until faculty feel that this issue has been addressed, the wide-scale adoption of commercial social media tools in the classroom will remain limited.”

– Pearson: Social Media for Teaching & Learning

The very nature of Social media is highly interactive and therefore engaging – permitting us to share our stuff – news articles, blogs, videos, photos, etc. – with our connections in practically real-time.

shareThe advantage of social media over LMS tools like the discussion forum is the convenience of sharing directly from the media to our connections – like the difference between email and texting.

“This is cool! I’ll share it. There – I shared it!” …five people liking it and three comments later and we’re engaged in a conversation.

So how do we get around this privacy thing?

The critical thing about social media when it comes to privacy is the social network. Some social networks can be made either open or closed, public or private. For example some Google Plus Communities are made available for anyone to join while others are by permission only.

Our campus uses Gmail for student email, so virtually every student has a Google Plus account whether they know it or not. They just need activate it. As an instructor I can create a private community in Google Plus for my course, email the students in my class and invite them to join. Content shared within a private Google Plus community is visible only to those who are members of the community.

There – we have a private social network. Now what?

The latest ECAR study on undergraduate students and information technology shows that students are willing to use their mobile technologies for educational purposes, they just need some instruction on how to do so.

With a little orientation students can quickly get up to speed.

Students need to know how to manage their networks or “circles” in Google Plus and then how to like (+1)  and to share media when they find it. As the community owners, we need to set some guidelines for our community so students know what is appropriate to share and how to engage in the conversation. We also need to show them the mechanics of the tools.

Categories can be created within the community. By using hashtags (e.g. #edtech) when sharing or posting media, the content and discussions can be organized into various topics and forums. This works great for managing small group discussion and assignments or for topically organizing the media and other content.

Students can share various media (location, photos, video) directly from their phones, tablets, or computers. Hangouts (live chat and video) permit up to ten students to interact remotely in real-time with desktop sharing, audio and video. This is especially helpful with collaboration in small study groups.

The Hangouts on Air feature permits the instructor or guest speakers to join the class from a distance and to stream, as well as record lectures, which are then automatically posted to the community timeline.

The private community is not limited to the classroom but permits the instructor to decide who can join the community. By expanding the network students from multiple sections, upper-classmates, alumni, and experts in the field can engage in classroom discussions.

Google Plus communities permit the faculty and students to share documents, spreadsheets, presentations, etc. anything stored in Google Drive – permitting students to collaborate in the development of class projects or share their portfolios.

Does social media belong in the classroom? I would say yes, depending on what you hope to achieve. There are many ways of engaging students by extending the classroom using social media if you are willing to invest a little time and effort to set up a private network.

A Social Media Primer…

Social Media by Eric Schwartzman on Flickr

CC-BY-NC by Eric Schwartzman on Flickr

There has been increased interest on our campus lately in the use of social media for instruction. Some of the discussion has been generated by a growing body of knowledge on how social media can increase learner engagement, as well as a need to leverage social media for marketing programs.

I have been using social media in both my personal and professional life for several years – sharing various media on Facebook, WordPress, Flickr, Twitter, Slideshare, and others. This discussion has me thinking about my own use of social media and networks, how the various aspects connect and blend. It seems to me that social media is becoming more and more complex.

For the next few posts I will attempt to consider different aspects of social media as well as how they contrast and complement one-another. First, I thinks it’s best we have a common language…

What do we mean by  “social media”?

“A term used to describe a variety of Web-based platforms, applications and technologies that enable people to socially interact with one another online. Some examples of social media sites and applications include Facebook, YouTubeDel.icio.us, Twitter, Digg, blogs and other sites that have content based on user participation and user-generated content (UGC).” – Webopedia

People often use “social media” and “social networks” interchangeably but there are some who feel strongly the differences are “vast as day and night”.

“…social networking is an act of engagement. Groups of people with common interests, or like-minds, associate together on social networking sites and build relationships through community.” – Social Media Today

I think perhaps the lines have become blurred over time but essentially social media is a medium for publishing user-generated content – could be writing a blog, or posting a video, sharing a presentation, art, photos, or any combination thereof.

Here is a list of the Top 15 Most Popular Social Networks as of December 2013…

I actively post and share on about half of them – mostly to do with educational technology #edtech, but also for topics of personal interest: #leadership, #greenbuilding, #productivity, etc. How do you use social media personally / professionally?

Next up… Social Media in Higher Education.